Read Hat Trick! Online

Authors: Brett Lee

Hat Trick!

In cricket, when one bowler takes three wickets with three balls, one after the other, we call this a
hat trick
. The taking of the hat trick may be spread out, eg another bowler might deliver from the other end of the pitch or the opposing team might have an innings. Hat tricks are rare.

It is thought that the term dates from the late 1800s in England, when the club would mark the achievement by awarding the bowler a new hat. Nowadays, the term is used in almost any sport to describe a run of three impressive feats by an individual, eg a soccer or hockey player scoring three goals in a game, a pitcher in baseball striking out three consecutive batters or in horse racing, when a jockey wins an annual race three years in a row.

Table of Contents

Cover Page

Epigraph

The Main Fielding Position

Glossary

Foreword

Prologue

Illustration

Book 1 Toby Jones and the Magic Cricket Almanack

1 The Equation

2 The Library

3 The Chase

4 The Gym

5 The Cricketer

6 The Past

7 The Run-out

8 The Mistake

9 The Heat

10 The Warning

11 The Simpson Hospital

12 The Visit

13 The Garage

14 The Agreement

15 The Proof

16 The Enemy

17 The Advice

18 The Return

19 The Letter

20 The
Wisden

21 The Game

Book 2 Toby Jones and Secret of the Missing Scorecard

1 Imagination

2 Fire

3 Jim’s Tale

4 Mini Cricket

5 Benchley Park

6 So Close!

7 Being Chased

8 The Great Don Bradman

9 A Birthday Away

10 Surprise Visitors

11 Nash Street

12 TCC Get Belted

13 Jim Returns

14 A Chase in the Car Park

15 How Much Does Scott Know?

16 Rescue at the Station

17 Georgie’s Surprise

18 Caught!

19 Trapped!

20 Jim’s Dream

21 Scott Lends a Hand

22 Tobler

Book 3 Toby Jones and the Mystery of the Time-Travel Tour

1 Runs on the Board

2 Virtual Cricket

3 Come Back, Jim

4 Can It Get Any Hotter?

5 All Tied Up

6 Georgie Snaps

7 Toby Jones Opens on Boxing Day

8 The Double-wicket Comp

9 The Crazy Ride

10 Ben, the Goodlooking Geek

11 The Surprise

12 Who’s Pixie?

13 I’m Not the Paperboy

14 Timeless Travel Tours

15 Collapse

16 Out of the Blue

17 Ally or Jessica?

18 Back to Brisbane

19 So Close

20 Trouble for Ally

Brett Lee’s Cricket Tips

Toby’s Interview with Andrew Symonds

2003 Australia v Pakistan Scorecard

The 1999 World Cup That Toby Did His Project On

1999 World Cup Scorecard

1999 Australia v Pakistan Scorecard

Rahul’s Interviews

1986 India v Australia Scorecard

1985 Australia v New Zealand Scorecard

1960 Australia v West Indies Scorecard

1930 England v Australia Scorecard

Under-13 Southwestern Division

How to Play Dice Cricket

How to Play Double-wicket Cricket

Toby Jones and the Timeless Cricket Match

Toby Jones and the Clash with Father Time

Acknowledgments to Book 1

Acknowledgments to Book 2

Acknowledgments to Book 3

About the Author

ALSO BY MICHAEL PANCKRIDGE

Copyright

About the Publisher

The Main Fielding Position

Glossary

bails
Two small pieces of wood that sit on top of the stumps. At least one has to fall off the stumps for a bowled or run-out decision to be made.

centre-wicket practice
Team practice played out on a cricket field, as opposed to in the nets. Sometimes two or more bowlers are used, one after the other, to speed up the practice. If the batter goes out, he or she usually stays on for more batting practice.

covers
A fielding position on the side of the wicket that the batter is facing, halfway between the bowler and the wicket keeper.

crease
There are quite a few creases in cricket. They are lines drawn near the stumps that help the batters and bowlers know where they are in relation to the stumps.

fine leg
A fielding position down near the boundary line behind the wicket keeper. Often a fast bowler fields in this position.

gully
A close-in fielding position along from the slips—the fielders next to the wicket keeper.

lbw
Stands for ‘leg before wicket’. This is a way for a batter to be dismissed. If the bowler hits the pads of the batter with the ball, and he or she thinks that the ball would have gone on and hit the stumps, then the bowler can appeal for lbw. If the umpire is sure that the batter didn’t hit the ball with the bat, then the batter may be given out.

leg-stump
There are three stumps. This is the stump that is nearest the legs of the batter.

maiden
If a bowler bowls an over and no runs are scored from it, then it is called a maiden.

mid-off
A fielding position next to the bowler. It is on the off, or bat, side of the pitch as the batter looks down the wicket.

mid-on
A fielding position next to the bowler. It is on the on, or leg, side of the pitch as the batter looks down the wicket.

no ball
If a bowler puts his or her foot entirely over the return crease (the marked line) then it is a no ball and the batter can’t be given out—unless it is a run-out.

off-stump
The stump that is on the batting side of the batter.

third man
A fielding position down behind the wicket keeper but on the other side of the fine leg fielder. The third man fielder is behind the slips fielders.

yorker
The name for a delivery, usually bowled by a medium or fast bowler, that is pitched right up near the batter’s feet. It is full pitched and fast.

Foreword

JUST like Toby Jones, I was obsessed by the game of cricket when I was a kid. I was always looking for ways to improve my game. I learned so much from my elder brother, Shane, and from seeking the advice of coaches. I read every cricket book I could get my hands on and I watched and learned from my idol: Dennis Lillee. Dennis was my inspiration, someone who I looked up to. I wanted to be just like him. (As it turned out, he has had a lot to do with my cricket career.)

I am sure you will find that this book is not only an excellent read, but also a very useful guide to the game of cricket. It contains lots of great hints and information that I hope you will be able to use to improve your own game.

When I first became involved in cricket, I had no idea where the game would take me. The opportunities and possibilities it has created for me are endless. Cricket has taught me many valuable lessons. Most of all it has shown me that if I always play hard and
enjoy
the opportunity of representing my country, I will be successful.

Every time I get asked to offer cricket advice to kids, my answer is always the same: enjoyment is the most important part of the game. When I am on the field, you will nearly always find me with a huge smile on my face. After suffering several injuries in my younger years, I have learned to make the most of every moment I get to play cricket.

This book reminds me of my own childhood days spent in the backyard with my brothers, always battling hard on the pitch to see who would be the champion player at the end of the day.

Toby Jones and the Magic Cricket Almanack, Toby Jones and the Secret of the Missing Scorecard
and
Toby Jones and the Mystery of the Time-travel Tour
all bring back truly great memories for me. I hope you enjoy reading
Hat Trick!

Brett Lee

Prologue

What wonders abound, dear boy, don’t fear

These shimmering pages, never clear.

Choose your year, the
Wisden
name,

Find the page, your destined game,

Then find yourself a quiet place

Where shadows lurk, to hide your trace.

Whisper clear date, place or score

While staring, smitten; then before

(You hope) the close of play,

Be careful now, you’ve found the way.

So hide your home, your age, your soul

To roam this place and seek your goal.

Be aware that time moves on—

Your time, this time; none short, or long.

So say aloud two lines from here

Just loud enough for you to hear.

From a quiet spot, alone, unknown,

Back through time, now come—alone.

And never speak and never boast,

And never taunt, nor ever toast

This knowledge from your time you bring.

To woo the rest, their praises sing:

They wonder, and your star shines bright…

Just this once, this one short night?

But every word that boasts ahead

Means lives unhinged, broken, dead.

Don’t meddle, talk, nor interfere

With the lives of those you venture near.

Respect this gift. Stay calm, stay clever,

And let the years live on forever.

Illustration